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Ben Affleck’s twitter

by on May 2, 2013

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ben-affleck/150-a-day_b_3196668.html

Thought this was interesting. Today Ben Affleck limited himself to spending only $1.50 on food. In this blog he just talks about how Americans overproduce and over-consume. However, he cautions against the idea of severely cutting production and consumptions, but rather pushes for the U.S. to help other countries. He states that because we have a title of being a prosperous (relatively) country, we should go and help other countries who are suffering.

Just thought this was interesting. He’s one of my favorite actors (loved Argo) and I think that he does what he does with his Congo charity and such for all the right reasons. Just interesting, i don’t think I could live off of $1.50 for a day.

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7 Comments
  1. This was a really interesting article that reminded me a lot of the discussion that we had in class regarding Africa and the idea of catastrophic convergence. The hunger disaster has become naturalized overtime due to the extreme lack of resources. As a wealthy and prosperous nation (although we do have poverty among us), we often regard starvation, refugee, and disease related issues that are impacting places like Africa as being too great to change. I think that efforts that are taken by people like Ben Affleck are extremely important in terms of taking steps towards having solidarity with those who are suffering. The extreme uneven distribution of resources throughout the world is a huge ethical and social issue that I believe, can only best be addressed by the work of motivated, conscious, individuals and groups.

  2. ginner35 permalink

    I think that efforts like this from Ben Affleck are a good start to fight a battle like the one against hunger. By itself, this will not bring about the change necessary, but it has to start somewhere. I look at problems like hunger in Africa in a “there’s nothing I can do about it” sense and it is comforting to see that someone like a celebrity is focused on trying to bring about this change. Like Affleck states, I agree that it is up to a nation like the United States to join and try to combat the battle against hunger in poor countries like Africa because without the United States there is really no way for them to overcome this.

  3. I agree, and I do sympathize with all of your comments. I agree with the tone of Affleck’s idea more so than what is actually said or how previous classmates’ comments digest and react to his food production comments. It is crucial to not get too rapped up or too quick to react, because that sensation to react can perhaps just as quickly leave. Remember what we heard just a few weeks ago about US attempts to help relieve hunger and famine. We use our food over-production to assist the nation in crisis. It just adresses the effect of the greater problem that will still exist after our imported aid dries up and so do our desires to give assistance. More comprehensive solutions are required.

  4. I think that Ben Affleck’s idea could be one that could grow in America. I believe that Americans are too stubborn to not consume to the quantity that we already do, but might “take pity” on the rest of the world. By making Americans feel powerful, they might be more obliged to help out others countries that are in dire need of assistance. America will always consume way too much, however if this idea to have a moral responsibility to the rest of the world, there might be more aid given to our fellow humans.

  5. I think that one thing Affleck is not addressing in this article is whether the price we pay for goods is the actual price or a subsidized price. That is something that vitally impacts our consumption habits and the lives of those producing our goods. Rather than experience living on $1.50 a day or donating to developing nations, I think it is even more vital that we as consumers defend the rights of those producing our goods and demand for living wages.
    As a result this is bound to increase the price of the product and reduce consumption, but it will be doing so in a way that still ensures the proper pay for those in developing nations.

  6. If awareness is the most important thing to getting changes to happen then Ben Afflecks actions are important because they may spurr people on to action regarding the plight of people in absolute poverty. However as we have seen in class people have a fascination with the current big story but as time goes on we forget because something new comes up. I think Affleck is doing a good deed, however I do not think it will have a major impact on how we consume or make us change our lifestyles at all, which is disheartening but it goes to show the power of the media.

    It is this fickleness that I believe anvironmental awareness is not the answer to climate change, people cannot stay focused long enough to pay attention to the long confusing details of yet unknown consequences.

    • I found Affleck’s attempt at using only $1.50 in one day as a way of bringing attention to a bigger issue of global poverty. He is clear in stating that this is not an attempt to make people feel bad if they are financially stable or affluent, but a reminder that those with power are responsible to help those who are vulnerable. As the US is 5% of the world’s population yet we control 35% of the world’s wealth, while roughly 3 billion people control only 1% of the world’s wealth is truly disheartening news. I think the point of this blog is to keep people aware of their social perspective in society and how that contributes or hinders progress that can be made to making global society more egalitarian in helping the poor of the world.

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